California Cedar Siding

California is home to many
great species of wood products. The forests in California produce cedar, redwood, pine, doug fir and a few
hardwoods. The California Forestry Regulations are stricter than the FSC
certifications so you can be sure your wood is sustainably green. Cedar siding and redwood siding are two of the more
popular choices for custom home builders. Knotty pine paneling is an inexpensive
alternative to redwood paneling and cedar
paneling
. This is why California residents often get the best pricing
nationwide on the wood products.

Cedar Siding and Wood Siding

Cedar is the much preferred choice of homebuilders over other types of construction materials.  Cedar siding is resistant to insects and fares better over time in inclement weather.  Once properly pre-stained, cedar will maintain its look for years and only needs a fresh coat of stain every 3-5 years, depending on the stain.  When quality is your main concern, Lumber Out West will only sell the best cedar siding available on the market.  No shortcuts are taken to make an extra buck.

Cedar Siding California

All quality cedar comes off the pacific west coast of the United States and Canada.  The reason this particular type of cedar is better than it’s inland relatives is that the climate for slow growth is best by the wet, cold environment of the pacific northwest.  All vertical grain cedars come from this area.  The wood tends to be redder in color and have fewer knots than it’s inland cousin.  If you’re looking for quality cedar siding or redwood decking then Lumber Out West is the place for you.  We only deal in quality, high-end cedar and redwood lumber products.  Give us a call toll-free at 866-972-7301 or email us for a customized quote.

Cedar Siding Profiles

Western Red Cedar siding can be milled into a variety of profiles to suit just about anyone’s taste.   The common patterns are beveled, both plain and rabbeted, tongue & groove, shiplap and covelap.  Typically, the thickness of any milled siding product is approximately 11/16″ unless it is a beveled pattern.  Bevels range from 1/2″ thick to 1″.  One thing to remember, the wider the board the more problems will occur because of the width.  The best way to avoid problems is to stick with either a 6″ or 8″ wide board.  Anything wider and there will be an occurance of occasional cupping and warping.

Western Red Cedar Grades and Uses

Western red cedar is sold by the “grade” or quality of the milled lumber.  When a tree is logged it is transferred to the lumber mill and sorted into separate piles depending on its’ quality.  This separation allows the mill to take all the logs of a specific grade and mill them together saving time.  The grades are separated by the quality of the wood which basically means knotty cedar or clear cedar.  The knotty grades are used for fencing, decking, and structural support where the knots do not detract from the aesthetic look of the project.  The clear grades are used when a more clean, finished look is desired whether for indoor paneling or outdoor siding and decking.

Western Red Cedar Siding

The best time of the year to purchase cedar siding is during the winter months when lumber mills are slow and are looking to move inventory.  Logging ends every fall due to bad weather and picks up again in the spring when the snows melt and logging trucks are able to get back into the forests to cut trees.  Don’t wait too long, however, because each spring when inventories run low the price of certain cedars goes up due to its’ scarcity before the summer milling months.

Moisture Content of Timbers

The large size of timbers makes kiln drying impractical due to the drying stresses which would result from differential moisture contents between the interior and exterior of the timber. For this reason, timbers are usually dressed green (moisture content above 19 percent), and the moisture content of timber upon delivery will depend on the amount of air drying which has taken place.

Like dimension lumber, timber begins to shrink when its moisture content falls below about 28 percent. The degree of shrinkage depends on the climatic conditions of the environment. For example, timbers exposed to the outdoors usually shrink from 1.8 to 2.6 percent in width and thickness, depending on the species. Timbers used indoors, where the air is often drier, experience greater shrinkage, in the range of 2.4 to 3.0 percent in width and thickness. Length change in either case is negligible.

When constructing with Posts and Timbers or Beams and Stringers, allowance should be made for anticipated shrinkage based on the moisture content at the time of assembly. Where the building envelope relies on caulked seals between timbers and other building components, the selection of caulks should take into account the amount of movement which must be accommodated as shrinkage occurs.

Minor checks on the surface of a timber are common in most service conditions and therefore an allowance has been made for them in the assignment of working stresses. Checks in columns are not of structural importance unless the check develops into a through split that will divide the column

Lumber grading Rules

Lumber inspection and grade rules writing. WWPA is one of seven grading agencies in North America authorized to write and publish grading rules for lumber. The Association also conducts regular inspections at mills to assure consistent quality between mills. Each year, WWPA lumber inspectors check lumber representing some 10 billion board feet of production.

Western Red Cedar as insulation

Wood being a good insulator assists in keeping our homes cool during the summer and warm in the winter. Western Red Cedar is superior in its ability to resist thermal conductivity more than any other commonly available softwood. At 12% moisture content it has an R value of 1.35 per inch of thickness, which is 8 times better than concrete, 400 times better than steel, and 2,000 times that of aluminum.